Resources

AGCI makes publicly accessible thousands of video presentations, research publications, and other resources from our workshops and projects. Use the search and filter options below to explore the resource library.

Sheep in pasture in front of solar panel array

How “agrivoltaics” can provide more benefits than agriculture and solar photovoltaics separately

Recent research evaluates how agrivoltaics -- co-locating solar electricity generation and agricultural production -- may achieve sustainable energy and food goals while possibly reducing local opposition to solar energy deployment.

By Aspen Global Change Institute Staff

Research Review
October 18, 2021
Flames from 2018 Lake Christine fire climb up “ladder fuels” into the crowns of dense forests atop Basalt Mountain in Colorado.

After the megafires: What’s left and what’s next

Something is clearly different about the wildfires roaring in the western United States. Over the last decade, we have increasingly used terms like “megafires” and…

By Emily Jack-Scott
Research Review
September 16, 2021
Brazilian rainforest

Tipping points in tropical forests: Carbon fluxes in the Amazon and Africa

Representatives and scientists from nearly 200 nations are in the process of carefully vetting a summary for policymakers of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change…

By Emily Jack-Scott
Research Review
July 22, 2021
Presentation
April 15, 2021

What is realistic and feasible?

By Sally Archibald
Presentation
April 14, 2021

Field Observations of Carbon Stocks

By Kristina Anderson-Teixeira
Presentation
April 14, 2021

Will Tropical Forests Slow or Accelerate Climate Change?

More than half of all species live in tropical forests, which process five times as much carbon annually as humans emit from fossil fuel use. Tropical forests sustain societies, safeguard biodiversity, and help regulate the climate system. Their protection is needed to eliminate carbon emissions by 2050 and limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. As a result, there is an intense focus on slowing forest loss and restoring new forests. But there is a third, neglected piece of the puzzle: What is happening within remaining forests?  

In this lecture, Simon L. Lewis, Professor of Global Change Science at the University of Leeds and University College London, describes the role of remaining tropical forests in the contemporary Earth system over the past three decades. Using a pan-tropical network of long- term tropical forest inventory plots tracking over 2 million individual trees in 27 countries, Dr. Lewis demonstrates how intact tropical forests have been a globally significant factor in slowing climate change. However, there are hints that all is not well in the world’s last remote tropical forests, and Dr. Lewis also explores tropical forests’ potential to begin accelerating climate change in the future, a scenario that would impact us all.

By Simon Lewis
Public Lecture
April 14, 2021